Qisse- The Legends of Love 

What is your inspiration of love? What idea of love suits you the most- only the physical gratification or a soulful union too? You are invited to share your views.

 

Reading, knowing and being aware that a selfless, soulful, true love, in which the two lovers do not have a desire to possess, are not jealous, and find happiness in each other, is not only motivating and inspirational, but a solace to the starving heart as well. Also, it is always a pleasure to read about those who have achieved the zenith of love, who have met their soulmates and are living in perfect union with each other, in the way that yogis say, ‘you am I and I am thee’.

We, in the world of technology, too, have become technical, torn apart between the cravings of body and the needs of soul. Everyone is looking for that ‘one’, without wanting to be ‘the one’. This needs a lot of conviction, empathy, and shunning of materiality. With this in mind, I have decided to write this book, with not one, or two, rather three stories of eternal love. They are intermingled with each other in a way that one is the part of other.

The three stories I am talking about come from the land of undivided Punjab, half of which now lies in India and the other half in Pakistan, and are the mythic legends of Love- or Qisse. These are the stories of love found, and lost in the world, and attained to the fullest in world of spirits. These lovers go beyond what is physical, much beyond the idea of possession and long for union, not unity. A union is one in which the two merge together to form a new and higher than earlier identity; in unity the two remain separated. They are more like Khalil Gibran’s soul searching Love found in oneness of the life, and ‘the Life’. He writes, “Love possesses not nor will it be possessed, for love is sufficient unto love’.

This is what has given me the inspiration. What is your inspiration? How do you look at love? What is your idea of ideal love? I shall be delighted, and will appreciate if you would share your thought on the subject. It shall help me understand you better as I write for you. If you have other great ideas, please use the ‘Contact’ form.

⭐️⭐️⭐️ I shall soon be sharing the three stories as told in popular folklore! ???

… Sahar Raman Deep

 

 

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Lust and Philo-sophy by Isham Cook

Book Review: Lust and Philosophy by Isham Cook

Lust and Philosophy by Isham Cook is a hypnotic saga of a man’s desperate desire to be with a particular woman, even though she is not the first one in his life. This ‘being with’ is in no way spiritual or platonic. It’s a physical attraction to three ‘B’s- beauty, bust and buttocks’, to the extent that it even becomes an obsession. This is described by the narrator’s likeness of his state of mind to that of the situation in Shakespeare’s ‘King Lear’. It is as violent and mutilating as Lavinia’s rape and cutting of her tongue thereafter, or mother getting ready to eat flesh off her dead sons’ bodies. it is also cross cultural, as the story is set in China with an American protagonist in search of his Chinese love interest. And, there is not one love interest!

As is evident, there is a lot of reference to tradition, including religious, and a lot of questioning. Things are seen in a different light. Everything physical has a reference into the past, and ultimately, they merge into philosophy. The images of Madonna and the child, the description of the Anunciation, all are a representation of sexuality, and the argument is impressive. In fact, Simone Martini’s ‘Annunciation’ (1333) is even said to be hinting at Mary’s rape! (She is no where Mother Mary, or the ghost is the ‘Holy Ghost’.) There are references to other great philosophical works to, including Louis Althusser’s ‘Lenin and Philosophy’ and Jean Baudrillard.

Style wise, this book is rich with detail, drama and a lucid description. Juxtapositions, contradictions and satire is common. There are surprises.  On the other hand, it is also a psychological adventure. It is a good read for those who seek to have deeper understanding of the relationship a man’s mind has with women and their bodies, which the narrator measures on the scale of nine and ten; ten being the perfect.

… Sahar Raman Deep (10/15/16)

Princess Diana (2) The Rising Star

She loved Diana, and. She wanted to be Diana- the princess. She was a rising star, with faded lights.

“Why do you always look towards the sky?” Her mom asked her one day.

“Because I am going to shine like moon someday” she said with a sparkle in her eyes, a dream in her voice, and uncertainty in her heart.

“Become moon or star, but only after death.” Her mother said with sarcasm. “Better concentrate on picking rags now. Only they will get us a good meal at night.”

Roshni looked at her with eyes as if a dream had shattered in them, but she recollected herself. “You see ma, I am going to shine one day.”

This time her voice wasn’t as bright.

…to be continued.

 

Sahar Raman Deep

Princess Diana (1)

She was Diana, and she was a princess extraordinary!

Heart was her kingdom, and Love was the throne. Respect was her seal, and affection was the crown. Compassion was her supremacy and sympathy the rule.

Her world was a fairy tale!

She lived in a slum, loved and cared for. She was the oldest of six, and never went to school. She picked up rags in the day, and sat her baby brother at night. At dawn, she woke up earlier than everyone else. She walked on the bare streets, empty handed; all alone. She looked at the fading stars, the lighter moon and the rising sun. She loved light; light was her name- ‘Roshni’.

To be continued….

10/8/16